Learn how to make coffee at home!There’s truly nothing like a good cup of coffee. Whether it be a morning wake-up, or alongside an afternoon conversation with a friend… a warm mug around a campfire or an iced drink on a hot summer day, a well-made cup of coffee be the perfect complement to any occasion.

But sadly, there’s also nothing like a bank account that’s full of transactions from coffee shops. According to Statista, the average price of a cup of coffee is $3.12, which doesn’t sound like much. But let’s say you do that once a day during the workweek, and then once more over the course of the weekend. That’s over $75/month… or $973/year. Wow.

Luckily, you don’t have wait in line at Starbucks, scour Yelp for the hipster shop downtown, or buy a four-figure espresso machine to enjoy great coffee. In fact, there are multiple ways to brew really good coffee right at home. With the right knowledge and minimal equipment, you can not only rival the taste that used to only come from a seasoned barista, you can also save a ton of money.

When it comes to making coffee at home, there are a ton of great at home brewing methods, each with varying levels of difficulty, and different tasting notes. As we go through these methods, we’ll talk about the benefits, the risks, and cost of each method. We’ll also outline the equipment you’ll need, as well as the type of grind needed to make a great cup of coffee.

Pour Over

Pour over (also called a V60 drip) is a great introduction into the world of craft coffee. The equipment is inexpensive, the brewing process is quick and simple, and the clean up is easy.

First off, you’ll need a v60 dripper. Here’s a great all-in-one bundle: HARIO V60 BUNDLE. If you just want to buy the dripper, my favorite is the HARIO CERAMIC V60, and here’s another less expensive option MERCRAFT CERAMIC POUR OVER COFFEE DRIPPER. You’ll also need paper filters, such as these right here: HARIO V60 PAPER FILTERS.

V60 is a great way to make coffee at home

One of the benefits of this method is how customizable it is. Using a V60, you’ll really be able to bring out the more complex flavors of the coffee, so feel free to experiment with water levels and the amount of grounds you use. One of the limitations of this method is that it only makes one cup at a time. If you’re in a place where you’re making coffee for a group, this method will have you standing at the counter for much longer than other methods.

Here’s a step-by-step process:

PREP

  1. Put the V60 on top of a mug. Unfold the filter and place it in the dripper. Rinse the filter with hot water. Pour out the rinsing water, but leave the filter in the dripper.
  2. Grind 18-20 grams (around 2 tablespoons) to a fine grind (think table salt).
  3. Bring your water to 195-205 degrees. (If you don’t have a kettle that gives you the temperature, bring the water to a boil, then wait 45 seconds before pouring).
  4. Pour the grounds into the filter. Gently shake to get the grounds to the base of the funnel.

BREW

  1. Pour about an ounce of water over the center of the grounds, fully submersing the grounds in water.
  2. Wait about 45 seconds, or until the grounds have absorbed the water.
  3. Pour a steady stream of hot water over the grounds, using a circular motion. Pour water on the beans (and water), and try to avoid pouring water on the filter.
  4. Keep the V60 about 2/3 full of water until you’ve poured 10-12 ounces in.
  5. Wait for the water to filter through the funnel, then enjoy!

CLEAN UP

  1. Remove your V60 and hold over a trashcan.
  2. Grab the edges of the filter and discard the filter and used grounds.
  3. Rinse your V60 and air dry for next use.

See, this method is extremely simple, as is the cleanup. From start to finish, this method takes about 3 minutes.

French Press

French presses have been around for almost a hundred years, but they’ve regained their popularity in the last decade or so. Like the pour over method, making a French press is quick and easy. One great thing about this method is that it is scalable, meaning that the bigger press you have, the more coffee you can make at once. For this tutorial, we’ll look at a standard 4-cup press. My preferred press is a BODUM CHAMBORD FRENCH PRESS, but here’s a more entry-level, but super rad looking option: RITUAL BAMBOO FRENCH PRESS.

PREP

  1. Rinse out your press with hot water.
  2. Grind 38-40 grams (5 tablespoons) to a medium coarse grind.
  3. Bring your water to 195-205 degrees. (If you don’t have a kettle that gives you the temperature, bring the water to a boil, then wait 45 seconds before pouring).
  4. Pour the ground beans into the press.

BREW

  1. Cover the beans with water, pouring about 4 ounces in the press
  2. Wait about 30-40 seconds, allowing the coffee to bloom
  3. Slowly pour water over the beans until filled to a ¼” below the pouring spout
  4. Wait 30 more seconds, then gently stir
  5. Place the lid on the press (but don’t plunge)
  6. Wait 3:00-3:30, then slowly and gently plunge the press
  7. Pour into mugs, and enjoy!
  8. If there is coffee left over, pour it into another vessel to keep it from brewing more

CLEAN-UP

  1. Remove the plunger, and rinse both the plunger and the press with hot water until clean
  2. Allow the lid, plunger, and press to air dry for next use.

As you can see, this method is also fairly simple, but with the added benefit of making multiple cups at once. Clean up is a little messy, but still simple. From start to finish, you can make four cups of coffee in less than five minutes.

Chemex

While a Chemex may look more like a science experiment than a coffee maker, it’s actually a really scientific way to make coffee. If you’re looking for coffee with the least amount of outside factors affecting the flavor of your coffee, Chemex is the way to go. According to chemexcoffeemaker.com, Chemex is: “Clear, pure, flavorful and without bitterness or sediment every time. The coffee only comes in contact with the scientifically designed filter and non-porous glass. With the Chemex® method, you can make coffee as strong as you like without bitterness. Perfect for iced coffee and coffee flavoring for gourmet recipes. Because of its purity, Chemex® brewed coffee can be covered and stored in the refrigerator for reheating…without losing its flavor!”

This process is a lot like a classic pour over, but you’ll need a CHEMEX BREWER. There are brands other than Chemex that make similar models, such as the less-expensive BODUM. You’ll also need paper filters. For purest flavor, I prefer the CHEMEX BRANDED FILTERS.

PREP

  1. Unfold the filter and place it on the 6-cup Chemex. Rinse the filter with hot water. Pour out the rinsing water, but don’t remove the filter.
  2. Grind 40 grams (around 5 tablespoons) to a medium coarse grind.
  3. Bring your water to 195-205 degrees. (If you don’t have a kettle that gives you the temperature, bring the water to a boil, then wait 45 seconds before pouring).
  4. Pour the grounds into the filter. Gently shake to get the grounds to the base of the funnel.

BREW

  1. Pour about an ounce of water over the center of the grounds, fully submersing the grounds in water.
  2. Wait about 45 seconds, or until the grounds have absorbed the water.
  3. Pour a steady stream of hot water over the grounds, using a circular motion. Pour water on the beans (and water), and try to avoid pouring water on the filter.
  4. Pour 20 ounces onto the grounds.
  5. Wait for the water to filter into the Chemex, then enjoy!

CLEAN UP

  1. Dump the grounds, and wait for the Chemex to cool.
  2. Remove the wooden handle
  3. Rinse the inside & outside of Chemex
  4. Using either vinegar water or CHEMEX CLEANING SOLUTION cleaning solution, clean inside and outside of Chemex
  5. Rinse once more, and air dry for next use.

As you can see, brewing with a Chemex is fairly simple (with a total brew time of 4-5 minutes), but the cleanup is a bit of a chore. Being that the Chemex is built like a beaker, it can be rather difficult to clean.

Aeropress

Aeropress is one of our favorite ways to brew coffee. The equipment is inexpensive, mobile, and extremely easy to use. From start to finish, it only takes less than 2 minutes to brew, and less than a minute to clean up.

You’ll need an AEROPRESS, which comes with a scooper, stirrer, and filter holder. You’ll also need AEROPRESS SPECIFIC FILTERS.

PREP

  1. Insert a filter and soak it until it sticks to the bottom of the filter cap.
  2. Screw the filter cap onto the Aeropress, and place the entire unit on top of a mug.
  3. Grind 18 grams (2 1/2 tablespoons, or one full scoop of whole beans from the Aeropress filter) to a fine, salt-like grind.
  4. Bring your water to 195-205 degrees. (If you don’t have a kettle that gives you the temperature, bring the water to a boil, then wait 45 seconds before pouring).
  5. Using the funnel, pour the ground beans into the press.

BREW

  1. Pour about 8-10 ounces of water over the beans, just above the “4” marker on the Aeropress.
  2. Gently stir the coffee and water mix.
  3. Place the plunger on top of the press, and wait for 75 seconds.
  4. After the 75 seconds, push the plunger slowly down, taking 10-20 seconds to plunge
  5. Remove the Aeropress from the mug, and enjoy!

CLEAN-UP

  1. Over a trash can or compost bin, remove the filter cap and push the plunger to the base of the Aeropress. The grounds and filter will pop out into the trashcan.
  2. Rinse the press, plunger, and filter cap and allow to air dry for next use.

As you can see, the Aeropress is quick and easy to clean. Being that the entry cost is only $35, it truly is a great, modern way to brew. The only negative of the Aeropress is that it is limited to one cup of coffee at a time.

Japanese Iced Coffee

If you’re wanting your coffee cold, Japanese iced coffee, sometimes called “flash brew” or “iced pour-over,” is the best (and easiest) option. It has a really quick brew time, and really lets the flavor of the beans shine.

You can make this using a Chemex or a pour-over, but for this tutorial, we’ll use a KALITA WAVE, which is very similar to the V60 we mentioned earlier.

PREP

  1. Put the dripper on top of a mug. Unfold the filter and place it in the dripper. Rinse the filter with hot water. Pour out the rinsing water, but leave the filter in the dripper.
  2. Grind 28 grams (around 3 tablespoons) to a fine grind (think table salt).
  3. Bring your water to 195-205 degrees. (If you don’t have a kettle that gives you the temperature, bring the water to a boil, then wait 45 seconds before pouring).
  4. Pour the grounds into the filter. Gently shake to get the grounds to the base of the funnel.

BREW

  1. Pour 8 ounces worth of ice into your KALITA WAVE GLASS SERVER.
  2. Pour about an ounce of water over the center of the grounds, fully submersing the grounds in water.
  3. Wait about 45 seconds, or until the grounds have absorbed the water.
  4. Pour a steady stream of hot water over the grounds, using a circular motion. Pour water on the beans (and water), and try to avoid pouring water on the filter.
  5. Keep the dripper about 2/3 full of water until you’ve poured 8 ounces in.
  6. Wait for the water to filter through the funnel, then enjoy!

CLEAN UP

  1. Remove your Kalita Wave and hold over a trashcan.
  2. Grab the edges of the filter and discard the filter and used grounds.
  3. Pour the coffee and ice from the glass server into a drinking glass. Rinse your dripper and server, and air dry for next use.

See, this method is extremely simple, as is the cleanup. From start to finish, this method takes about 3 minutes.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are so many ways to make great coffee at home! It’s easy, fun, and a great way to get into the world of craft coffee. In addition to trying different brew methods, you can explore different types of coffee beans, water temperatures, and grind types. For a full look at the process of choosing ingredients, check out the 5 Things You Need To Make Great Coffee at Home.